• Language:

Categories

Bookmark & Share





 

Osteoporosis &Calcium Requirement

Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones become fragile and brittle, leading to a higher risk of fractures (breaks or cracks) than in normal bone.

Osteoporosis occurs when bones lose minerals, such as calcium, more quickly than the body can replace them, leading to a loss of bone thickness (bone mass or density). As a result, bones become thinner and less dense, so that even a minor bump or accident can cause serious fractures. These are known as fragility or minimal trauma fractures.

Any bone can be affected by osteoporosis, but the most common sites are bones in the hip, spine, wrist, ribs, pelvis and upper arm. Osteoporosis usually has no signs or symptoms until a fracture happens - this is why osteoporosis is often called the 'silent disease'.

Fractures due to osteoporosis (osteoporotic fractures) can lead to changes in posture (eg developing a stoop or Dowager's hump in your back), muscle weakness, loss of height and bone deformity of the spine. Fractures can lead to chronic pain, disability, loss of independence and even premature death.

 

To Prevent Osteoporosis :

  • Exercise Regularly
  • Avoid Smoking or Eating Tobacco
  • Avoid Drinking Alcohol
  • Take a diet rich in Calcium and Vitamin D

What is your daily requirement of Calcium and Vitamin D ?

Age

Birth - 6 months
6 months - 1 year
1 year - 10 years
11 years - 24 years
25 years - 50 years
51 years or older
51 Years -64 Years
65 Years or older

Sex

Both
Both
Both
Both
Both
Women
Men
Men

Estimated Requirement of Calcium per day

400 mg
600 mg
800-1200 mg
1200-1500 mg
1000 mg
1500 mg
1000 mg
1500 mg
 

(Source : National Institute of Health)


Age

Birth - 6 months
7 years - 50 years
During Pregnancy and Lactation
7 years - 64 years
65 years and above
50 years and above

Sex

Both
Women
Women
Men
Men
Women

Estimated Requirement of Calcium per day

100 I.U.
100 I.U.
400 I.U.
100 I.U.
400 I.U.
400 I.U.

In case of Women, 50 years is considered as the mean age of Menopause. In case of early menopause, 1500 mg of calcium and 400 I.U. of Vitamin D should be considered as daily requirement from that age onwards.

Exercises To Prevent Osteoporosis :

What are the best exercises for strong bones?


Exercises which mean your body has to carry its own weight (e.g. walking, but not swimming), and which involve running, jumping or skipping, help new bone to grow and prevent bone loss. Walking, jogging, dancing, tennis, volleyball, lifting weights, and netball, are all good.

Tips for a good bone-health exercise program

  • to have an effect on bone, exercise needs to be REGULAR and FAIRLY VIGOROUS. Doing a VARIETY of different exercises is best because it exercises bone in different ways. SHORT, INTENSE BURSTS of exercise (e.g. 15 minutes lifting weights or very brisk walking) is probably better for bones than a leisurely one hour walk.
  • 2 short exercise sessions (20 minutes) separated by 8 hours is better for bone, than one long session
  • Start slowly and progress gradually
  • Activities that promote muscle strength, balance and co-ordination, help to prevent falls. Pilates, gentle yoga and Tai Chi are all good activities to help prevent falls.

Exercise for managing osteoporosis

If you already have osteoporosis and have had fractures, it’s good to ask a doctor or physiotherapist before starting an exercise program.

  • start with a basic strengthening program
  • join a falls prevention class
  • if you have had a fracture

avoid jarring, twisting or jumping movements

avoid abrupt or sudden high impact movements

aavoid abdominal (stomach) curl ups

avoid forward bending from the waist

avoid heavy lifting

 
Home | About Us | Facilities | Health Tips | Photo Gallery | Inquiry | Road Map | Contact Us | Sitemap
Copyright @ 2005-2009, Shreeji Orthopedic & ENT Hospital, All rights reserved